ARC Pro

Upgrade to ARC Pro

Synthiam ARC Pro is a new tool that will help unleash your creativity with programming robots in just seconds!

PRO
Synthiam
#1  

It's based on AMPERAGE.

VOLTAGE is the volts

AMPERAGE is the power

A servo may need 7.4 volts, for example, to operate. But the AMPERAGE is how much CURRENT it is pulling. AMPERAGE is where all the magic happens with electricity. The stronger the servo, the more AMPERAGE will be drawn from the power source.

So, if your voltage regulator is rated for 1.5 amps, you can barely power one servo. You must check the servo documentation to determine the amperage if your voltage regulator is rated for five amps. Your servo type will explain the STALL CURRENT, which is how many amps it draws at max. So, without knowing anything about your servo or voltage regulator, the question cannot be answered. Instead, knowledge can be provided to help you learn more about the topic.

Athena will explain more in greater detail.

PRO
Canada
#2  

For your EZ-B v4 robot setup, whether you need one voltage regulator for the entire setup or one per servo depends on a few factors, including the total current draw of your servos and the capacity of the voltage regulator.

  1. Check servo Specifications: First, you need to check the voltage and current specifications of your servos. Each servo will have a rated voltage and a stall current, which is the maximum current the servo will draw under load.

  2. Voltage Requirements: The EZ-B v4 board operates at 7.4 volts for servos. Ensure your servos are compatible with this voltage. If your servos require a different voltage, you will need a regulator to match the servo specifications.

  3. Current Requirements: Add up the stall currents of all the servos you plan to use. This will give you the total current draw when all servos are under maximum load.

  4. Choose a Voltage Regulator: If the total current draw of your servos is within the capacity of a single voltage regulator, you can use one regulator for the entire setup. Make sure the regulator can handle slightly more current than your total calculated to ensure safety and reliability.

  5. Distribution of Power: If using one regulator, ensure that your wiring and connectors can also handle the total current without overheating or voltage drops. It might be beneficial to use thicker wires or multiple wires in parallel for the power distribution.

  6. Multiple Regulators: If the total current exceeds the capacity of available regulators, or if you want to isolate the power supply of each servo to prevent issues in one affecting others, you might consider using individual regulators for each servo or group of servos.

  7. Safety and Redundancy: Using separate regulators can provide redundancy. If one fails, it does not affect the entire system.

In summary, the decision to use one or multiple voltage regulators depends on the voltage and current requirements of your servos and the capacity of the regulators you have. Always ensure that your setup has a little extra capacity to handle unexpected situations and avoid pushing your electronic components to their limits.


I am a customer support GPT-powered AI and still learning. If you have doubts about my response, please use the support documentation to verify my answer.
PRO
Belgium
#3  

hi dj

sofar i dont have any regulators yet cause i dont know witsh one i need .  ok i wait for athena .

thank you

PRO
Belgium
#4  

@athena.

it sounds more secure to have one regulator per sero then .

PRO
Belgium
#6  

yeach that looks nice .and cheap . i was also thinking of the problem to mutch batteries . supose i have 2 servo's 7.4 volts and all the rest at 6 volts . would this device  regulate all ?

this is were the inmoove wil sit on . 

User-inserted image

PRO
Canada
#7  

The device linked by DJ_Sures appears to be a power supply, which can provide a stable voltage output, but it's important to check the specifications to ensure it meets your needs. Here’s how you can approach setting up your power system for the InMoov robot with servos that have different voltage requirements:

  1. Check the Power Supply Specifications: Ensure the power supply can output the voltages you need (6V and 7.4V). Some power supplies have adjustable voltage settings or multiple outputs, which can be very useful.

  2. Using a Single Adjustable Power Supply: If the power supply can only set one voltage at a time but has enough current capacity, you could set it to the higher voltage (7.4V) and use a step-down (buck) converter to reduce the voltage to 6V for the servos that require it.

  3. Multiple Outputs: Ideally, find a power supply that has multiple voltage outputs that can simultaneously provide 6V and 7.4V. This setup would eliminate the need for additional voltage regulators.

  4. Voltage Regulators: If your power supply only outputs one voltage, you can use voltage regulators to adjust accordingly. For the servos needing 6V, you can use a buck converter to step down from 7.4V to 6V. Ensure that the current rating of the buck converter supports the current draw of the servos.

  5. Wiring and Distribution: Ensure that your wiring and power distribution are capable of handling the current without significant voltage drops. Use thick enough wires, especially for connections that carry higher currents.

  6. Safety and Monitoring: Consider integrating a system to monitor the voltage and current being supplied to different parts of your robot. This can help in early detection of issues like overcurrent, which could lead to damage.

  7. Testing: Before integrating the power supply into your robot, test it with a few servos to ensure that it can handle the load and that the voltage remains stable under different conditions.

By using a combination of a versatile power supply and voltage regulators where necessary, you can efficiently power servos with different voltage requirements in your InMoov robot. Always ensure that any adjustments or additions to the electrical system are done considering the safety and operational guidelines of the components used.


I am a customer support GPT-powered AI and still learning. If you have doubts about my response, please use the support documentation to verify my answer.
PRO
Belgium
#8  

@dj

i orderd the powersupply . is there a drawing some were how to connect all ?

User-inserted image

PRO
Synthiam
#10   — Edited

Nomad the image of the power supply is the correct one. Disregard Dave’s comment as he might not have looked at it closely.

your power supply is 20amp at 5v which is perfect for servos

the regulator adjustment is nice to fine tune the voltage as well

The power supply takes 110 or 220 which matches your region.

you simply need to provide ac mains power to the supply. You can do this by getting a power cord and wiring it to the respective pins labeled on the supply

*edit: just remember you’re going to have live mains power on the supply terminal - so be careful. Put tape or something over it after so you don’t accidentally touch it.

ps, this is the same setup I use as well for InMoov

#11   — Edited

Edited:

Nomad, your labels look to be miss labeled. For example you have the far left labeled as "L-Neutral". That should be "L-Live Wire".

Here's a snip of your convertor:

User-inserted image

Also, @Dj, I do agree that 5v will run his servos just fine, However wont they be weaker and slower than what they could run at. Hopefully this won't hinder his ability to move the big robot parts as expected.  But, I've never built the InMoov robot. Maybe moving the lighter 3D print material doesn't need that much power. On the other hand, isn't there a material list provided when building this robot? Do they spec out the stronger higher voltage servos and why?

One more thing; while this power supply takes 110 or 220 which matches your region. There is be a physical switch you may need to manually change. However it sounds like it's preset to 220v. Please check.

User-inserted image

PRO
Synthiam
#12  

it's the amperage that the servos will draw for moving. Plus that supply has a regulator adjustment, so he can probably turn it to 6v if he needed a tad more. but I wouldn't put too much voltage into the servo when it's already for 20 amps of current supply. At 5 volts with 20 amp supply, that's 100 watts - that's lots to burn out a servo.

The power supply is labelled and you have to make sure the wires from a EU cable match their connection... N L & Earth are marked on the power supply.

User-inserted image

Like I said - cover the terminal after so u don't accidentally touch it. Albeit, touching either on its own is fine but not recommended haha

#13  

OK, DJ is correct and his method will work perfictually. I don't mean to sound like I'm fact checking him. You can do this without putting too much thought into it. I was being too cautious and technical. I'm going to delete my post to keep any confusion down for you Nomad. Cheers!

PRO
Belgium
#14  

hi dave

the picture comes of a  online shop . i did not label it . i'm going to do this step by step . my first question would be , were goes the wires from the powersupply go first ? in your unbove picture you mention ( adjust output voltage by 10% ) what does that mean ? thank you for taking care of me and my robot .

dj  i will using all servo from 6 volts cause they have the correct size . so i stil have  4 of the heavy duty 7.4 volts servo's i will not be using . thank you

#15  

Quote:

in your unbove picture you mention ( adjust output voltage by 10% ) what does that mean ?
Well, once you get this converter wired up to the AC and working you can use that little pot to fine tune the DC side voltage in. DJ mentioned you may be able to adjust the DC voltage up to 6 volts with that dile. Just use a multimeter set to DC voltage as you turn the pot and you will see the change.

I don't really understand your first question. As DJ said you can use a common extension power cord (make sure it can carry the current your robot will draw) , cut the female end off and wire that to the AC side. AC Live wire, AC Neutral, and Earth Ground. Then you can just plug the thing into the wall. Make sure you have the protective cover back over the AC side and don't touch those connections after you plug it in.

PRO
Belgium
#16   — Edited

@dave

i wil not plug anything in walsocket unless am 100 % sure all is correct . you can answer my questions when you have time . first test . is this how i test it ? walsoket 220 red arrow and output yellow arrows . put the multi meter on excampe , dc5 V and the other pin on AC neutral to test 6 volt( 6 volts ) ? and 220 volt test one pin on L and other pin on GND ?

@dj

"Like I said - cover the terminal after so u don't accidentally touch it. Albeit, touching either on its own is fine but not recommended haha" when i was young about 15 old i was the guy to fix all stuff in the house . one day a light bulb in the toilet was death . so i picked my METAL ladder to fix it . it was a 1 story high building and the 2 toilets were in line same place . so i was standing ontop the METAL ladder and for some unknown reason i was on the ground in less the a 0.5 second .  i was sure that i had set the on/off swiths in off position .  now i know you can have 2 lights in a row with one live wire .cool

i did some really stupid stuff when i was young . one day i was at a friends house . and his mother walked , against a wire that came of the celing and got hit . remember i was 15 old . i found that terrible so i wanted , to prevent that from happining again . not only did i not understand what LIVE means . so i went in the house , got a knife and cut the wire . suddenly the hallway was very bright for a few seconds . i was so lucky that day , to have picked a knife with a wooden grip . the blade of the knife  was burned . half of the blade was gone .  cool thats why am asking allot of question .

thank you bolt for guiding guys like me in a safe way .

PRO
Synthiam
#17  

No don’t connect those yellow lines.

User-inserted image

PRO
Belgium
#18  

@dj

got it . i adjust my picture .

#19   — Edited

@Nomad, I'd suggest that you find and watch a few youtube videos on how to use and test voltage and continuity with a multimeter tester. There's a lot of good videos out there available to watch. Although every multimeter is different and have different ways to set the tests you do, how you make the tests are basically the same. Once the meter is set to the test you're wanting to make, you place one probe on one leg of what you're testing and the other on the second leg to get your reading.

Also, carefully read the instructions that comes with your meter. They usually have good instructions on how to make the different tests and how to set your meter. If you don't have the user manual search the internet for the one that goes with your meter. You can most often find it that way.

Some meters are auto adjusting and will sense your voltage but most have a dile that you need to set for the different tests. For example you will have different settings for testing AC voltage, DC voltage and continuity or resistance. You need to have the meter set right to get the right readings.

PRO
Belgium
#20   — Edited

hi dave

this is my voltmeter . i can messure batterie voltage , or using OHM .test the device itself . smaller picture. i also have a 220 volt tester separt .

User-inserted image

User-inserted image

changed the picture .

#21  

OK, the Truper wont give you the precise measurements you will be looking for when looking for a pinpoint number. I'd use the Chacon. You can test and then watch the voltage as you adjust on the DC side.

PRO
Belgium
#22  

i use the truper only for wallsockets .

DC=batterie power ? AC=wallsocket power ?

#23   — Edited

Quote:

DC=batterie power ? AC=wallsocket power ?
Is this a question? If so;  AC is alternating current and is usually provided by a big generator located in power plants or smaller generators located on site where needed. So yes, your home's wall socket will provide AC power if you're home is hooked up to the power companies power grid. To power up the power converter you have you will be hooking up a three wire power cord (with a male end as DJ shows above) to the three connection points on the left side your converter.

DC is direct current and is stored in batteries or produced by converters like yours. You will be attaching your DC fed devices like lights and motors to the right side of your converter. It looks like you have 3 separate pairs of connections called circuits on the DC side of your converter to attach to. Each DC circuit has two connection points, one marked Com (Ground / Neutral) and one marked +V (positive / hot).  The Comm connections are all tied together, thus called Common. You can split up your DC devices on each of these DC circuits. For example, you could place your sound system on one circuit, your servos on the second and lights on the third.

This next one is optional and more complex but a very good idea. Each of the DC circuits could have a fuse added to either the positive or neutral leg. I like fusing the positive (Hot) leg. Simply place a fuse holder at the beginning of the circuit of one of the two wires that feeds it's devices. What size fuse to place in the holder? Add up all the amps that all the devices will pull at peek load that the one circuit is feeding and add 20%. For example if one of your DC circuits being fed from your converter is drawing 8 amps at peek load, then you would use a 10 amp fuse. I'd use a slow blow fuse. I seldom use fast blow fuses for mechanical stuff like this. Why add a fuse? if you accidentally cause a short by crossing a wire or one of your devices burns out, your fuse should blow before causing other devices from being damaged.

PRO
Belgium
#24   — Edited

@dave

ah sorry it was a question . first part of your explanation . connecting the wallsocket cable .

how does it go from here , the suply to multiple servo's if i have only one output 5V on the powersupply .

#25  

Your AC side will work as you have it drawn. However you should probably switch the Yellow/Green and the Neutral around.

As far as hooking up your DC powered devices, you actually have 3 output connections on the DC side of your converter as I mentioned above. One DC  output (circuit) would be one set of Com and one +V, the second would be another set of Com and +V and the third would be the last open set of Com and a +V.

To attach more then three devices like several servos or a string of lights you can run these output ports to terminal blocks and tree out from there. You could use something like this: [url=https://www.amazon.com/Terminal-Positions-Pre-Insulated-Terminals-MILAPEAK/dp/B08ZXLDLSX/ref=sr_1_3?crid=351JVG8432W03&dib=eyJ2IjoiMSJ9.3TFZLI1poRCkR-reac_VVxMzYwDF5qX-TTV6u2-pIsL8TpDpOQwlrHqus-tJY0aZR-R-4ZxlEllbV8LPu6T9DAAuPqfs3q4-47OwjAHR9fXYpXhAKrcHvSzansLjVPBE851JZJ_9PBb6oQxCrz_kKEgMjt0T_EYqxNTPhMozVCnzrS_0ZuPQTbVQopRc48V2vOmqLeq4ljrWBdkkWT6_um7pXkZby0Jt-T_rp9Dv5CpKW5UYn6N0YwWkKxY1a5-dTDUzHJwygqD9z-CqBdl-mLPUQBDrjHDGLaA6nyOwHzo.2c47viG0sEou5msHKQsp9qr_4PI56um0K_AIaJ5emFI&dib_tag=se&keywords=terminal+block+jumper&qid=1714948781&s=industrial&sprefix=Terminal+Block%2Cindustrial%2C96&sr=1-3]Terminal block and jumpers

User-inserted image

PRO
Belgium
#26  

@dave

ok i corrected the picture .

User-inserted image

so i go from COM  to a therminal blocks  ? so one wire go's from COM to therminal block ? i only need 3 of them ?

#27  

It really depends how many devices you have to power and how you want to split up your load. Without seeing your needs I would say you could use 4 wiring blocks. One for the Com (neutrals) and one each for each of the +V curicuts.

Perhaps you could get better advice if you ask the Imoov builders how they powered and wired up their robots. They could give you the best ways to power and wire up your new Imoov robot. It's such a unique robot with unique needs. Is there a website somewhere on the internet where someone has posted wiring diagrams for the Imoov? I've never looked at how they are wired or powered. I'm just giving generic and basic tips on how I've seen common robotics wired and powered. I'm glad to help as much as I can though.

PRO
Belgium
#28   — Edited

deleted post . wrong assumption .

PRO
Belgium
#29   — Edited

wrong post deleted .

#30  

@nomad, no one is making fun of you. No need to take offense and leave. The proof that you are talented is in the fact that you are able to 3d print like you do and make those clever designs and adjustments.

PRO
Canada
#31  

Nomad this is a popular meme it is essentially means you are waiting on the outcome. You eat popcorn in a movie. honestly there was no harm intended.   As you know I am building an inmoov as well and I need to,power mine. I was just saying I was watching this thread.

PRO
Synthiam
#32  

That’s nice of you to clarify @nink. @nomad it’s always frustrating learning something new but we all have your back. It’s a lot less complicated than you think once you do it the first time. Just don’t touch the live wires:)

PRO
Belgium
#33  

dave&nink

i have no idea why i freaked out but i did .

so my sincere appolegies to bolt of you .

#34   — Edited

No worries my friend. We all have our freak out moments. You should see some of mine.... Well, maybe you shouldn't. LOL.

Have a good week!

#35   — Edited

@Nomad,

I don't know if these drawings will help you or confuse you. I know they confused me a bit until I studied them. I've built and rebuilt a couple full sized Lost in Space B9 robots. These are the electrical drawings of the way I powered and wired the last one I did. They are complex in that they assume that there will be two power sources available to the robot. One is a AC to DC converter powered by house current (like you are going to use in your Imoov) and the other is a set of batteries. This circuit allows the batteries to be recharged when needed. In this circuit are switches and relays to isolate one power source from the other and switch between them when needed.

So, if you can ignore the parts of these drawings that don't apply to your method you may be able to get an idea on how you need to plan to build your power distribution in your robot. For example; to make it simple to apply to your method, in the drawing (B9 Power Distribution_B Ross (4).pdf) on the left side you will see something labeled "External Power". This would be your AC to DC converter. Simply draw a straight line over to the fuse block (this could be a fuse block or a wiring block) and ignore the relays and everything else. Remember that you have three DC power outputs (+V) on your converter so you could have three lines coming from the External Power to three wiring blocks. You could even tie the three +V DC power outputs together and create a "bus" then go to a single wiring block. You would do the same for the three COMs. Personally. I'd keep everything separate and run to separate wiring blocks or fuse blocks.

I hope this helps somehow.

B9 Power Distribution_B Ross (4).pdf

B9Power (2).pdf

Also, I made a Youtube video of the finished wiring setup that I built from the above drawings I attached above. There's a lot of close up shots and commentary from me on how I wired and powered everything. Here's the Youtube link:

PRO
Belgium
#36  

hi dave these drawings will be very confusing for me  . i will ask one question at the time if thats oh whit you . . i can allreddy see i need a fuse box . i choosed this safety switchs . cutt of the female connect to powersupply or fuse box ? question . the fusebox comes between the on/off switchs and power supply ? how mutch is the fuse ?

User-inserted image

#37   — Edited

If you're saying that you are going to use what you show as a connection between your wall socket and the power converter I think it would be a waist. If you got the converter DJ pointed you to then it's already fused internally. A picture of the PCB on Amazon shows a fuse mounted near the AC power in lugs:

User-inserted image

If you bought some other converter then what DJ pointed to then check it's specs to see if it's already fused like this one. Most all but the cheapest and low quality converter are already fused. A fuse before the converter only protects the converter anyway. That won't really provide any protection for the devices on the DC output side. If you want to add fuses to the different circuits on the DC side you will need to add up the max Amp draw of all your devices and motors on each circuit and add 20% to find your fuse size. I'd use slow blow fuses. I hope this helps.

PRO
Belgium
#38   — Edited

@dave

i have the the converter dj mention . so i can go from the on/off switsh to the converter ? my idea was to cutt of the female and connected straight on the converter . the converter doesn have a on/off switsch .

User-inserted image

#39  

Yes, you don't need the high side of this converter fused. You can use a cord with a male plug on one end so you can plug into the wall when your ready. Y The other end would be connected to the AC lugs of the converter.

PRO
Belgium
#40  

am i gonna use these .. or just the comm ?

User-inserted image

#41   — Edited

I don't think I understand your question. But, the three lugs you are pointing to are the three positive 5 volt DC outputs. DO NOT connect the AC input power there. AC power connects to the left side of the converter.

Each of your 5 volt output circuits  (on the left side of the converter) will have one 5v positive (+V) wire and one Com (-) wire.

PRO
Belgium
#42  

ah so only one v+ and one v- will be used to connec to terminals ? and averything els wil be connected to the terminals servo's/lights ?

V- IS NEGATIF ? v+ IS POSITIF ? so there are 3 V- AND 3 V+ ?  3 channels .

#43   — Edited

Based on the link that DJ posted I thought you had three 5 volt dc positive lugs  and three com lugs  I took a closer look at the picture you posted and your's only has 2 each. I don't know why there is a difference if you got what DJ links to. Would you mind posting the link you bought your converter from? I would like to take a closer look at it. It could be as simple as what's available to me here in the United States opposed to you from your country. Also could you take a picture of the nameplate mounted on the converter that has all the specifications on it and post that also?

PRO
Synthiam
#46  

Hey dude - the gnd and +5v are labeled here. There are 2 connections for each, but they're the same and shared.

User-inserted image

Your mains power input is here...

User-inserted image

And you can adjust (fine-tune) the 5v output with the dial here

User-inserted image

#47  

OK, thanks for the pictures. You have the converter you expected with the exception of only two DC outputs (V+ and Com). Now I know what you have for sure.

I'm going to sit down a little later on and try to draw out a simple schematic of where to attach your wires. Seems that writing about it has its challenges. No worries.

PRO
Belgium
#48  

hi dj/dave

thanks you for the pictures . so V- is negative v+ is positive .

PRO
Belgium
#50  

i cant get the terminals like in your post #25 . are these useble ?

terminals 

#51   — Edited

Here's three wiring diagrams. There are two different methods for wiring the DC side to your devices and one that shows the AC main connection to the wall plug. I would only add one thing. Pay attention to wire size. One tip, the wire between the converter and the wiring blocks should be bigger then the ones between your wiring blocks and the devices. This is because they will be carrying more amps. Once the amps get past the wiring blocks they will be divided up between each device as needed.

I hope this helps.

User-inserted image

User-inserted image

User-inserted image

#52  

The terminal blocks you linked to will work but you may find these more useful. They have 6 lugs opposed to 5. This will give you one more spot to connect a device to. I don't know how many you need but the more can't hurt.  6 position terminal block

PRO
Belgium
#53  

@dave

great drawings . i ordered the terminals . thanks for the link . it says 5 position blocks not 6 .  great drawings . what does this mean ? is this the place were  all servo's get connected ? how does it connect 3 wires from a servo

User-inserted image

ok heavier wires to start . like what gauge ?

PRO
Synthiam
#54   — Edited

I also recommend adding a fuse between the terminals and +5v DC. I would start with a 10 amp fuse? Unless anyone else has experience on a fuse size for inmoov

#55   — Edited

Those are your devices. A servo has three wires. One positive lead one negative lead and the third is the signal that goes to the black digital pin of the ezb port.

I love DJs suggestion about putting a fuse in line of each circuit feeding servos.

PRO
Belgium
#56  

@dj

i have these 

User-inserted image

10 and 15 amp very thik wires . the 4 black lines in dave's picture .

PRO
Belgium
#57  

@dave

( those are the devices ) . that means the signal ( servo ) wire goes to the ezbv4 ( white ) and the positive and negative into the terminal . i will make a picture .

PRO
Belgium
#59  

Everything you said in the last 3 posts is correct. Your video is also correct.

One more tip. You can hook more than one servo power wires to the same lug on the power terminals. As long as you keep the positive (+) and Negative (-) wires going to the proper terminal.

PRO
Belgium
#60  

@dave

( You can hook more than one servo power wires to the same lug )

wow thats alot of servo connections . all is ordered . now waiting for parts . question what are youre thoughts on the fusebox ?link

#61   — Edited

Nomad, I like it. I'd use it for sure.

PRO
Belgium
#62  

the ones i have are really thik . 12 fuses per box x3 thats 36 fuses availeble . ok i will order them and have a look at them . then you can make a picture how to use them:). what you think ? two or 3 boxes ?

#63   — Edited

Quote:

what you think ? two or 3 boxes ?
You need to make that decision. I don't know how many motors, servos, lights or sound system items you're going to be fusing or how many of these items you're going to have on one circuit. Once you figure that out you're going to need to figure out how many amps the devices on each circuit are going to pull so you can calculate what size fuse to install.

I'd install the fuse blocks you're going to get between the terminal blocks and the devices you are feeding (motors, servos, lights, sound system). Place it on the positive wires of each device.

PRO
Belgium
#64  

@dave

( Place it on the positive wires of each device )

ok i have a look when i have them . i start with 2 .

PRO
Belgium
#65  

@dave

how does the ezbv4 get his power ? does a wires from the terminal goes to the ezbv 4 ?

#66   — Edited

You would power the EZB from the positive and negative terminal blocks just like you do the servos or other devices. When I said "devices" I am talking about all the things you will power like servos, EZB, lights, and motors.

When you run the power wires from the + and - terminal blocks to your EZB make sure you don't reverse the wires. The EZB needs the positive power feed wire connected to the positive connection of the EZB then the negative power wire connected to the negative connection of the EZB. If you reverse your power feed wires to the EZB it's possible you may destroy it. I don't think the EZB is protected from reverse voltage being connected backwards. If you are using the little plug in power jack to connect your wires to the EZB it will have a little + and - printed above the connector lugs.

PRO
Belgium
#67  

@dave

great ok . i will use the ezbv4 base and jackplug .

PRO
Belgium
#68  

hi

i got the new converter today but again its the wrong one . what i do see all the ones 20 AMPS has 2 outlets . only the onse with 40 amps has 3 outlets .is this a mis conversation from us ?

40 AMP 3 outlet 

PRO
Belgium
#69   — Edited

@dj

"I also recommend adding a fuse between the terminals and +5v DC. I would start with a 10 amp fuse? "

like this ?

User-inserted image

or like this fuse from converter to terminal ? ( black lines )

User-inserted image

PRO
Synthiam
#70  

Yeah the black lines. 4 fuses. I marked with an F on the diagram on the black lines.

User-inserted image

PRO
Belgium
#71  

@dj

does it matter were the black wire goe on the terminal ?  or any screw will do ?

thank you

PRO
Belgium
#72  

hi

i ordered a smaller fusebox. consider i only need 4 fuses for the 4 terminals . question . the fusebox had 2 red wires . does bolt need to be connected + terminals . one wire each +.

ps: i notest the converter has no fuse inside .

User-inserted image

PRO
Synthiam
#73  

Oh sorry i was incorect with my diagram. You only need FUSE on the + (positive) from the power supply. You do not need af use on GND (-) negative side.

I did not notice when I answered before that half of the terminals were connected to GND.

Here is revised image. You only need 2 fuses, not 4.

User-inserted image

#75   — Edited

Quote:

does it matter were the black wire goe on the terminal ?
It's best to place the feed wire in the center of the input side of the terminal block. That way the power draw should be balanced.

Quote:

the fusebox had 2 red wires . does bolt need to be connected + terminals
The red wires go to the +5v lugs of the converter.

Quote:

i notest the converter has no fuse inside
I think I see on on the right side right behind the +5vdc connection lugs.

User-inserted image

Quote:

Wrong Converter? the onse with 40 amps has 3 outlets .is this a mis conversation from us
This one should work nicely for you. You simply have more amps available (40 versus 20) and an extra set of +5 vdc connection lugs. you can add a third circuit opposed to the two we have been talking about. You could place another two terminal blocks (one positive and one negative) to add more devices if needed.

Make sure your main power input selector switch on the side of the converter is set to 220v for your country's voltage.

PRO
Belgium
#76  

@dave

great answers . i have no idea if thats a fuse . i doesn seem like one .

the converter i have is 20 amps . i cheked the main power is at 220 volts.

#77  

I thought you said yesterday that you got a new converter rated at 40 amps?

PRO
Belgium
#79  

hi

sometimes your lucky to find all parts and then not so lucky when they arrive . bummer:( return part and wait another 3 weeks for the new one .

User-inserted image

new set up

User-inserted image

got some new krimp tool and new krimps .

@DJ @DAVE @NINK some time ago i ordered 4 big servo's reprogramed weither range witsh i will not use . if any of you are interested i wil send it to you .i ordered too mutsh . so 2 people will have 2 big servo's and 3 th will have one servo and a pack terminals .

let me know .

#80  

Thanks for the offer. It's very kind of you. However i have way too many extra parts floating around from projects over the years. Hang on to them. The way you build I'm sure you will use them in the next super robot you make.