Question
Asked October 29 2014

Community Question

Sometimes when designing different robots to interface with the EZB(4). Consideration must be given to whether additional fuse protection may be needed or required.

If the EZB(4) is taken out of its housing then the fuse protection is left within the plastic shell. When connecting your choice of power to the now non-fused EZB(4) here is an option that can be built to protect your circuits. It is fairly easy to build and does not take up much space which is a good thing in the land of robots.

It consists of connecting Mini Deans connectors and soldering mini blade fuses of the amperage of your choice. The example pictured shows a 5 Amp fuse being used. And just a little red heat shrink tubing was also added.


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Synthiam
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October 30 2014
Does the V4 have polarity protection? I was thinking of putting a diode in the power line on my dev kit to make sure I never hook it up backwards and see magic blue smoke (I know some people lost V3s that way).

Alan
Jeremie
Synthiam
October 30 2014
Yep the ez-bv4 has a reverse polarity protection diode, resettable polyfuse, and in the power base/robot bodies there's a 20Amp mini-blade fuse as well.
October 30 2014
I'm a big fan of fusing circuits. It's saved my butt (and the robot) many times because sometimes I get in a hurry or don't think things through. Then bad things happen. The only time I don't fuse is with some motor controllers like a Sabertooth. They don't recommend fusing the controller but to fuse the motor.

Nice work Doc! Thanks for sharing your genius.
July 4 2016
Would it be possible to replace the fuse with a circuit breaker?
July 4 2016
If you find a circuit breaker that is low power enough to properly lockout, then I don't see why not.